Would you know what to do if your boat capsized? Here, we discuss common mistakes that sailors make when their vessels overturn.

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What Not to Do When Your Boat Overturns


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12/15/2014
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As a sailor in Seattle, you pride yourself on knowing the ways of the water. You know when a choppy day will likely turn smooth, or when the water gods are just too angry to bother. So when you took your visiting relatives for a boat ride up the Sound, you were caught off-guard when the wind picked up, waves began to form, and you and your passengers ended up in the water when your boat capsized.

You’ve taken a plunge in the drink before, but your inexperienced land-lubber family has not. They have begun to panic, which makes you second-guess yourself. Your first priority is to get them to safety, but with your nerves reacting the way they are, you aren’t sure of what to do.

Mistakes People Often Make When Their Boats Capsize

Sailors and passengers typically have good intentions when they suddenly find themselves in the water, but the excitement and stress of the situation can cause them to panic rather than act rationally and coolly. Making such a mistake can result in death. Here, we take a look at what not to do when your boat capsizes:

  • Do not swim to shore. You’re in the freezing water and the only thing on your mind is getting to shore, so you wonder if swimming there is a good idea. Well, it’s not: traveling through the frigid water exposes your body to the colder temperatures for longer, and it wears you out. Instead, stay right where you are.
  • Don’t ditch your boat. Leaving your boat is a bad idea, as it can act as a buoy. Additionally, it also makes you much more noticeable from a helicopter or rescue boat.
  • Don’t take off your life jacket. Stress and fear make people do strange things. Even the most experienced sailors can become unraveled when placed in panicky situations. If you think that taking your life jacket off is a good idea—for whatever reason—think again, because it is not. Keep it on at all times, as it may save your life.

Were You the Victim of Negligence?

If you believe your boating or watercraft accident occurred because of someone else’s negligence, the legal team of the Andrew Kim Law Firm may be able to help.

Contact us today to learn about what we can do for you, and how we have helped other victims just like you obtain the compensation they deserved.
 



Category: Boat and Watercraft Accidents

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