You watch your child try to manage her traumatic brain injury every day and feel helpless. You want to help, but you’re not sure how. Here, we offer ideas.

How can I help my child cope with a traumatic brain injury?

 

A:

A drunk driver hopped a curb in your neighborhood and hit your child as she rode her bike on the sidewalk. Although she was wearing a helmet, the doctor at Seattle Children’s Hospital told you she suffered a catastrophic brain injury as a result.

After a few weeks in the hospital, she returned to your home and is trying to do the things she once did, such as helping you around the house, playing with her friends, and engaging in physical activity. So far she has not been successful in any of her attempts, which leaves her angry and frustrated.

How Parents Can Help

For the first time in your daughter’s life, you don’t know how to help her. Everything you seem to say or do is wrong, according to her. Instead of taking it personally, keep trying. The following strategies may help:

  • Praise something every day. Over time, your child will likely make improvements. Talking about these victories every day can offer encouragement. Keep note of how she is getting better—even if it is subtle—and bring this up when she gets discouraged. Show her that even though it is a slow process, she is making strides.
  • Adapt to her capabilities. Children with TBIs typically don’t want to abandon the lives they used to have and may resent their parents if they change things too much. If your child is clearly unable to perform some of the tasks she could before, simply allow her to do something else of equal importance. For instance, if she used to ride her bike around the block after dinner and can’t now, invite her to take a walk with you instead. Let her know how much you enjoy her company and reassure her that she will ride her bike again one day.
  • Talk to her. Your child’s fears, frustrations, and sadness may cause her to keep her distance from everyone, including you. Sinking into depression can not only affect her emotional progress, but can set her back physically, as well. Encourage her to talk about her feelings on a daily basis. If she won’t talk to you, consider taking her to a therapist or other professional so she can express what she is going through.

Don’t Let the Negligent Party Get Away With This

Your child is in the midst of the biggest struggle she will likely face in her life, and when all the pain, frustration, and disappointment she’s experiencing is due to someone’s negligence, you deserve to seek justice.

The Andrew Kim Law Firm wants to help you hold the negligent party accountable for his actions. Connect with us today by filling out an online form or calling us at 800.636.3676 to request your free consultation and find out how we can help.


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Bellevue Office
11900 NE 1st Street
Suite 300
Bellevue, WA 98005
Phone: (425) 289-1990
Fax: (425) 289-1991
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Bellevue Office
11900 NE 1st Street
Suite 300
Bellevue, WA 98005
Phone: (425) 289-1990
Fax: (425) 289-1991

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